Frilli Gallery

March 4, 2011 / Art & Archaeology
Florence, Tuscany
The Frilli family of Florence has been producing sculptures since 1860, soon becoming the world’s most important supplier of high quality replicas. They are still going strong; there is something in their establishment to satisfy every taste, including faithful copies of masterpieces found in museums, as well as contemporary work. Each piece is cast in bronze using the “lost wax” technique, or hand carved in Carrara marble. There is an exhaustive repertoire in the shop, but even more to be found in their catalogue. If you can’t find what you want, you can even have something made to order.

The rooms, of some 500 square meters, are whimsically crowed with pieces of all sizes and subjects, vying for space: a life sized Roman discus thrower next to Michelangelo’s Bacchus, a crocodile next to a small bronze bronco-buster- and on and on in head spinning profusion.

One of the many important commissions of Frilli was the molding and casting of a replica of Ghiberti’s Doors of Paradise (the Baptistry). They now stand in place of the originals, which have been moved to the Duomo museum.

If that weren’t enough, the gallery also hosts exhibitions of contemporary sculptors, such as that of the Danish artist Bjorn Okholm Skaarup, whose playful work is haphazardly mingled with all the rest.

You’ll find the Frilli Gallery in an 18th century palace in the antiques quarter of Florence, at 26R, Via dei Fossi. Include it in a walking tour of the historic center. Be prepared to spend some time there. Be prepared to be amazed!

Patricia Glee Smith

by Patricia Glee Smith

Accomplished artist and very involved archaeology aficionado based in Otricoli, Umbria. Click here to view her artwork.

7 Responses to “Frilli Gallery”

  1. The photos bring me great comfort as I anxiously await my return to Tuscany!
    Grazie!

    Reply
  2. Lynn at Southern Fried French

    Now that’s a varied collection. what fun!

    Reply
  3. Mary Jo

    This looks wonderful! Can the average person visit it, or do you need to be “in the market” and purchase something if you go there? I accessed the gallery website and could not find anything definitive.

    Thanks for sharing this with everyone.

    Reply
  4. Pat Smith
    Pat Smith

    Mary Jo: Anyone can go in and wander around. They are very nice and love to talk about their history and so on. Thee is no pressure to purchase.

    Reply

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