Easy as 1-2-3

August 2, 2012 / Food & Wine
Italy

That’s Italian cuisine, for you, just a few ingredients and easily assembled.

However, the ingredients have to be top quality. Therefore, to put together bresaola, rughetta, e parmigiano, the bresaola should be freshly cut, very thin, and preferably from the best pork house on the piazza.

The rughetta has to be the one that backs a punch; no little round-leafed farmed rucola for this dish, but rather the darker green, pointy-leafed, wild variety.

Add some scaglie (flakes) of good ol’ Parmigiano Reggiano, and you’ve a dish for the summer gods.

Enhance it all with a drizzle or two of your best olive oil and a few drops of high-end balsamic vinegar from Modena. A little lemon juice is an alternative.

Nothing says summer lunch quite like this dish.

GB

by GB Bernardini

Editor, Italian Notebook

7 Responses to “Easy as 1-2-3”

  1. Evanne

    Thanks, dear GB. This is great. Another is caprese, which is simply sliced tomatoes, with sliced buffala mozzarella and basil on top, finished with salt, pepper, olive oil, and if necessary, a drop or two of vinegar. Nothing says hot summer meals like these two. Other than, perhaps, a dolce fa niente afterward.

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  2. vanna moore

    that is the best! One of my favorite light Summer dishes! Italian food is so simple and so delicious, and healthy!

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  3. Delizioso! Just reading this is making me both hungry and very home-sick for Roma, Italia, ecc, ecc!

    Reply
  4. Giuseppe Spano
    Giuseppe Spano

    the two salads are great,but why spoil with sweets afterward and give up the wonderful savory taste in your mouth?

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  5. Joan Schmelzle

    A great meal for sure. I know it won’t be summer and the arugula won’t be as described, but I have had and am looking forward to this meal in Rome.

    Reply
  6. Linda Boccia

    One of the main differences between good Italian food and many American dishes is the simpliticity of fresh ingredients. Here in California we have just about everything fresh, yet often chefs insist on adding so many confusing spices and herbs that the individual flavors of just one or two are lost.

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  7. Linda Gasbarro

    Omg does that sound delicious but as someone said there is no use in trying to make it here in US, the real beauty of a dish like this is the freshness of each ingredient and then to be lucky enough to enjoy it in italy is the real beauty of tasting each of those ingredients.

    Reply

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