Senigallia a mollo, ma non molla*

May 8, 2014 / Local Interest
Senigallia, Le Marche

Visiting Senigallia for the first time is like being single, meeting a good looking guy, and discovering that he has a great personality too. It’s easy to fall in love. Because Senigallia may be small, but it has a big heart.

That heart has been fully on display in recent days. On May 3rd, 2014, just a few short weeks away from tourist season, Senigallia’s Misa River overflowed and the result was a very powerful flash flood. A large portion of the city was under water.

alluvione-senigallia7
alluvione-senigallia11
alluvione-senigallia6
alluvione-senigallia4
alluvione-senigallia12
alluvione-senigallia5

Now what is left is mud and piles upon piles of discarded sofas, dining room tables and washing machines. Residents have been shoveling slop out of their garages, kitchens, living rooms and bedrooms for days. Shop owners are trying to salvage what they can of their inventory. The Protezione Civile has been on the streets, fielding questions, helping people cross the muddy streets, and directing cars to safer routes. Firefighters have saved young and old, working overtime to make sure that everyone is safe.

alluvione-senigallia18
alluvione-senigallia26
alluvione-senigallia21
alluvione-senigallia25
alluvione-senigallia30
alluvione-senigallia32
alluvione-senigallia17
alluvione-senigallia10

But it warms my heart to see the hundreds of volunteers hard at work. They are all over the city, from Borgo Bicchia to Lungomare, offering food, clothing, housing, and, of course, olio di gomito (lit., elbow grease). The usually dapper Senigalliesi are now donning rubber boots and helping their neighbors, with mud stains up to their eyeballs. And almost everyone is also wearing a smile. It’s a joy to see people working together, helping out, and giving what they can. People from small towns stick together, and Senigalliesi are no exception.

For up-to-the-minute information about the volunteer efforts and how you can help, visit the AlluvioneSenigallia FB page.

– Images by Mirko Silvestrini Urban Photographer. Bravo Mirko.. e grazie!

*trans. – “Senigallia is soaking, but ain’t givin’ up!” That’s also the rough translation of the caption for the following photo which has justifiably gone viral, by the Gent’d’S’nigaja organization.

alluvione-senigallia36
alluvione-senigallia34
alluvione-senigallia33
alluvione-senigallia31
alluvione-senigallia28
alluvione-senigallia24
alluvione-senigallia23
alluvione-senigallia22
alluvione-senigallia19
alluvione-senigallia16
alluvione-senigallia15
alluvione-senigallia14
alluvione-senigallia13
alluvione-senigallia9
alluvione-senigallia2
alluvione-senigallia1

alluvione-senigallia3

Enrica Frulla

by Enrica Frulla

Enrica was born in Italy, raised in the United States and is now living in Senigallia, on the coast of the beautiful Le Marche region. A marketing consultant in a past life, Enrica is now a freelance translator. Recently, her creativity and passion for telling people what to do has also  “translated” into an event planning business. www.besteventlab.com

14 Responses to “Senigallia a mollo, ma non molla*”

  1. Anna Engdahl

    Thank you. My mother was from Senigallia but no one I talk to ever heard of it.

    Reply
  2. Penny Ewles-Bergeron
    Penny Ewles-Bergeron

    I have nothing but admiration for the townsfolk and services who set to and help in these awful circumstances. Well done to them and thanks for bringing us their muddy smiles.

    Reply
  3. Anne Robichaud

    Viva, Senigallia! Enrica, our family has such strong ties to Senigalli – as we used to go there every summer with our three children. May Senigallia rise again!

    Reply
    • CeciliaBelenardo

      I incredible people,couldn’t believe the pictures!

      Reply
  4. Rosemary

    Oh my god! I had no idea this was happening. My heart goes out to these beautiful people! Looks like the tragedy has made them even closer and more dedicated to their city. Bravi Senigallia!

    Reply
  5. miriam favretto

    vi auguro la forza del Signore di ristutuire il vostro paese e che il Signore vi benedica tutti con la fede e corraggio forza Senigallia ,forza Italia aiutateli !!!

    Reply
  6. Enrica

    Thanks for your comments! The past week has been tough. So many heartbreaking stories, and so much loss. But amazing people doing their best to help. Just today I read about a group of women offering to wash people’s muddy clothes for free. And the local office supply is giving away free school supplies to students who lost their books in the flood. Sometimes it’s the little things.

    Reply
  7. Sì, questa è la prima volta che sento di Senigallia. Ma so che i paesi con bassi coste sono soggette ad allagamenti. Mio padre è nato a Napoli 1899. Sono un adulto di età adesso e io sono un artista. Lodo lo spirito delle persone che aiutano l’un l’altro in questo momento. Spero di passare i miei anni più produttivi in Italia, e sto imparando la lingua per la prima volta.

    Reply
  8. Anstell Ricossa

    Had not heard of this tragedy…. But what a group of courageous people. Know God will Bless them, and our love is with them !

    Reply
  9. Jan Johnson

    The power of the human spirit. Heartwarming! More posts from Enrica please.

    Reply

Leave a Reply